Flu shot options: a test of patient engagement?

Talking about the flu vaccine used to be straightforward. But with the proliferation of vaccine options, it has become much more complicated.

It isn’t even accurate anymore to call it a flu “shot”. The old-fashioned shot in the arm has been joined by intradermal and nasal spray versions of the vaccine. There’s now a quadrivalent form of influenza vaccine that protects against four strains instead of the usual three. Vaccines that used to mostly be available at the doctor’s office can now be obtained at community pharmacies, nursing homes, public health agencies, workplaces and even walk-in sites.

To add to this array, flu vaccine is not a one-size-fits-all proposition. The nasal spray can only be used among healthy children and younger adults. Ditto for the intradermal version. The new quadrivalent vaccine is thought to be more effective for children than adults.

More options for consumers = better for everyone, right? Well, yes. But here’s another way to look at it: With more choices that may or may not be appropriate for them, people increasingly need to take responsibility for educating themselves with accurate information.

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. Patient engagement has become the Holy Grail of health care – desired, sought after, and the focus of intense effort by health care organizations. Care tends to be better and more reflective of the patient’s values when people are active participants.

The real question is whether we’re ready for this.

While some folks are eager to be more involved in their care, others need a strong nudge of encouragement. Some don’t really want to be engaged. Others are unable to be fully engaged. Nor can we underestimate how critical it is for people to have good information, the many myths about the flu vaccine – It’ll give you the flu! It’s full of toxins! – being a case in point.

This year’s flu vaccine season in some ways has become a real-world laboratory for the public’s ability to make informed decisions. People will have to ask questions and read the fine print. They’ll need to know which forms of the vaccine are available and which are appropriate for them and their family, and decide accordingly.

Are we up to it? We’ll find out.

Find the CDC flu vaccine guidelines here.

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