Making friends with the patient portal

I’ll disclose this up front: I’m a big fan of the concept of allowing patients online access to their medical information through a patient portal. Family members who live in the metro area have been using portals for a few years, and now this feature is available locally too.

Patient portals are promoted as a tool to help patients become more involved and engaged in their care. It’s still a little early to know whether this actually is the outcome; portals just haven’t been around long enough to build up a strong body of evidence in their favor.

At the very least, though, they make it easier for people to find out their lab results, double-check their prescription medication list, etc., by simply logging into their personal account. No need to make phone calls or leave messages. No waiting for results to arrive by snail mail. And seriously, is there anything more annoying than to be told only that your lab results or X-ray were “normal”? Show me the numbers, please.

Not that there aren’t naysayers. Many folks haven’t been very impressed by their experience with patient portals – for example, health communication guru Steve Wilkins, who recently was introduced to the portal offered by his doctor’s practice and was underwhelmed. He can send messages to the staff and request appointments and prescription refills but apparently not much else. “Asking is certainly different than doing in my book,” he reflected. “How the heck is this supposed to make me feel engaged?”

I’ve heard other complaints that some portals are very restrictive in how patients are allowed to use them, thereby limiting the benefits.

A couple of thoughts: First, patient portals won’t instantly remove all the obstacles in doctor-patient communication. They’re a tool, and their success will partly depend on people’s willingness and ability to use them as intended. I think there’s going to be a learning curve before the benefits become apparent. In the meantime, everyone needs to be somewhat patient and not demand results like, right now.

Second, simply offering a patient portal doesn’t automatically mean it has value, as Wilkins points out. Practices that only allow a handful of non-interactive features on their portal will probably be disappointed when few patients sign up or actively use the portal… but they really shouldn’t be surprised.

My prediction is that engagement will be highest when the portal 1) has multiple features that appeal to patients and create a useful tool for health care self-management; and 2) is actively promoted by medical practices as something their patients ought to try.

Patient portals might sound like nothing more than a new technological spin on the exchange of information that has always taken place between doctors and patients. But the reality is that they’re helping shift the fulcrum of engagement toward the patient. Our medical information was always available to us but it was often presumed that it didn’t have to be shared unless we asked to see it. Now the presumption is that of course our information will be shared without first having to ask for it. See the difference?

One thought on “Making friends with the patient portal

  1. Great analysis of patient portals, Anne. I’ve used one (Epic’s MyChart) for about a year now and do find it to be convenient at the least. My docs don’t seem to be crazy about the messaging, but I do get a prompt reply from their staff.

    One other factor that I think will contribute to the success of patient portals is existing data. I’ve probably seen 5 different doctors in the past year or so, and every time I visit I go over vitals, family history, my medical history, lab tests, etc. And this has been going on my entire life! If I had all of that previous data in my patient portal, it would be far more interesting and useful to me. But instead, I just see one or two pieces of data in each of my different portals, and it really doesn’t tell me much.

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