The ‘shiver’ diet? Don’t we wish

We hardy inhabitants of the Snow Belt have joked for years about the calories we (theoretically) burn from shivering our way through winter.

But wait – could there be scientific evidence supporting shivering as a hot new form of winter exercise?

Apparently so, according to the New York Times, which reported today on a study suggesting that shivering boosts the metabolism in the same way that exercise does.

Study participants were brought into a lab on three different occasions. During the first two sessions, they were told to exercise on a stationary bike in an indoor temperature of 65 degrees, and samples of their blood, fat and skin cells were obtained. For the last session, the participants were instructed to lie down, lightly clad, for half an hour while the indoor heat was reduced from 75 to 53. Their skin and muscle reactions were measured and samples taken again to see what happened.

Lo and behold, the study subjects produced the same amount of irisin, a hormone involved in the conversion of white fat cells to more desirable brown fat, from shivering as they did from exercise.

From the article:

What seemed to matter, the researchers concluded, was not the exertion of the exercise, but the contraction of various muscles, which occurred during shivering as well as cycling.

In view of the fact that the temperature this morning on my way to work was 0 and most of Minnesota is under its umpteenth wind chill advisory of the season, readers will have to excuse me for not climbing enthusiastically onto the shivering-as-a-form-of-exercise bandwagon.

A variety of studies have shown that we do indeed burn more calories when we’re trying to stay warm. But whether this is an appropriate substitute for exercise is debatable, especially since the study described by the New York Times only involved 10 people – hardly enough to build a strong scientific case. And the article does in fact offer an important caveat: There seems to be no evidence that working out in the cold helps rev up the production of irisin anymore than exercising in warmer temperatures.

In a sentence that could only have come from someone blithely unaware of the dangers of frostbite, the author concludes that if you can’t get to the gym, “at least consider lingering outside at the bus stop and shivering.”

No, thanks. I’ll take indoor exercise over lingering at the curb with a minus 25 breeze in my face any day.

Tribune photo by Ron Adams

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